Advanced Study

Templeton Colloquia at the NDIAS

Blessed is the Gift of Laughter by Hazel Bowman

On Thursday, April 7 and Friday, April 8, the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) invites you to take part in "The Impact of Laughter and Humor in Our Past and Today’s Digitized World," a Templeton Colloquium led by Dr. Otto Santa Ana, 2015-2016 Templeton Fellow at the NDIAS.

This colloquium brings together scholars from anthropology, communications, digital media, neuroscience, political science, psychiatry and psychology, religious studies, and sociology to examine the origins, development, and neurology of human laughter; explore humor and laughter as deeply human expressions of imaginative cognition; and evaluate the use of laughter and humor as social and political mechanisms.

Sessions will take place in 200 McKenna Hall and will also be simulcast live on the NDIAS website.

This colloquium is sponsored by the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study, with generous funding from the John Templeton Foundation.

pdficon_smallConference Schedule

pdficon_smallConference Poster
 

Thursday, April 7

•9:00 am — Anthropological Perspectives on Laughter and Humor
Susan D. Blum, University of Notre Dame
Agustín Fuentes, University of Notre Dame
*Ilana Gershon, Indiana University

•11:00 am  — The Evolution and Development of Humor 
Greg Bryant, University of California, Los Angeles
Darcia Narvaez, University of Notre Dame
*Donald L. Stelluto, University of Notre Dame

•2:30 pm — The Biology and Neurology of Laughter and Humor
Matthew M. Gervais, Rutgers University
*Lee Gettler, University of Notre Dame
Joseph O. Polimeni, University of Manitoba
Sophie Scott, University College London

Friday, April 8

•9:00 am — Creativity, Humor, and Play
D. Fox Harrell, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
*David Bentley Hart, Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study
John Morreall, College of William and Mary

•11:00 am — Politics and Intersectionality in Laughter and Humor
Jody C. Baumgartner, East Carolina University
Raúl Pérez, University of Denver
*Donald L. Stelluto, University of Notre Dame
Simon Weaver, Brunel University London

•2:30 pm — Conclusions and Discussion of Closing Thoughts and Comments
*Brad S. Gregory, University of Notre Dame
Otto Santa Ana, University of California, Los Angeles

*Asterisks denote Session Chairs.


ndias_ecdc_03

On Monday, March 21 and Tuesday, March 22, Henrike Moll, 2015-2016 Templeton Fellow at the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS), leads a two-day Templeton Workshop entitled "Becoming Human: Evolutionary and Ontogenetic Stories about the Emergence of the Human Mind."

In this Templeton Workshop, Professor Henrike Moll will explore the emergence of the human mind, as demonstrated through scientific investigations and philosophical inquiries, and the origins of perspective-taking. This workshop brings together scholars from anthropology, history and philosophy of science, philosophy, and psychology to examine critical questions that address topics such as the emergence of imagination, "second nature," sentience, sociobiology, and kinship in human evolution, as well as the human-animal horizon.

This workshop is sponsored by the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study, with generous funding from the John Templeton Foundation.
 

Monday, March 21
•12:00 pm — Introduction
Presenter: Henrike Moll, Templeton Fellow at the NDIAS
•12:15 pm  — Imagination 
Presenter: Agustín Fuentes, University of Notre Dame
Respondent: Jeffrey Peterson, University of Notre Dame
•2:30 pm — Acquiring a Second Nature
Presenter: David Bakhurst, Queen’s University, Canada
Respondent: Sebastian Rödl, University of Leipzig, Germany
•4:00 pm — Humans Do Not Become Human
Presenter: Andrea Kern, University of Leipzig, Germany
Respondent: Henrike Moll, Templeton Fellow at the NDIAS

Tuesday, March 22
•9:30 am — On Purpose: Sociobiology and Sentience
Presenter: Michael Ruse, Florida State University
Respondent: Phillip Sloan, University of Notre Dame
•11:00 am — Human Form of Life
Presenter: Sebastian Rödl, University of Leipzig, Germany
Respondent: Andrea Kern, University of Leipzig, Germany
•1:15 pm — Who is Part of Me? The Emergence of Kinship in Human Evolution
Presenter: Jonathan Marks, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Respondent: Lane DesAutels, University of Notre Dame
•2:30 pm — Drilling Down on Homologies: How Far Does Evolutionary Relationship Explain the Human-Animal Horizon?
Presenter: Phillip Sloan, University of Notre Dame
Respondent: Michael Ruse, Florida State University
•4:00 pm — General Discussion
Presenter: Henrike Moll, Templeton Fellow at the NDIAS


A Lifetime of Looking by David Plunkert

On Monday, March 14 and Tuesday, March 15, the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) invites you to take part in "Mind, Soul, World: Consciousness in Nature," a Templeton Colloquium led by Dr. David Bentley Hart, 2015-2016 Templeton Fellow at the NDIAS.

In this Templeton Colloquium, Professor David Hart will explore the mystery of consciousness (the entirety of mental life), posing critical questions such as the place of nature within mind, and probing more traditional assumptions about the physicalist emergentist accounts of the origins of consciousness. In dialogue with other scholars he will take up the idea that careful reflection on the nature of consciousness yields an understanding of consciousness to which certain classical understandings of the soul (Western and Eastern) may prove far better suited than more materialist reductionist approaches.

No registration is necessary, and the colloquium is free and open to the public.

This colloquium brings together scholars from history, philosophy, and theology to examine critical topics about consciousness including whether consciousness can evolve or emerge from matter, intentionality and the transcendental ends of consciousness, classical metaphysics of the soul, Eastern contributions to the understanding of consciousness, and the soul and the whole of being.

Sessions will take place in 104 McKenna Hall and will also be simulcast live on the NDIAS website. We also encourage you to review a pre-circulated paper written by David Bentley Hart.

This colloquium is sponsored by the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study, with generous funding from the John Templeton Foundation.

flash3D Flash/HMTL5 Conference Schedule

pdficon_smallConference Schedule

pdficon_smallConference Poster
 

Monday, March 14
•9:00 am — Introduction
(with *Brad S. Gregory and David Bentley Hart)
•11:00 am  — The Problems with the Materialist Reduction of Consciousness 
(with Gerald McKenny, Janet Soskice, and *Luke Wright)
•2:00 pm — Can Consciousness Evolve or Emerge from Matter?
(with Stephen R. L. Clark, *Celia Deane-Drummond, and Michael Hanby)
•4:00 pm — Intentionality and the Transcendent Ends of Consciousness
(with John Betz, *Gretchen Reydams-Schils, and D. C. Schindler)

Tuesday, March 15
•9:00 am — The Classical Metaphysics of the Soul
(with Paul GriffithsJohn Milbank, and *Anna Bonta Moreland)
•11:00 am — Eastern Contributions to the Understanding of Consciousness
(with Robert Gimello, *Bradley Malkovsky, and R. Trent Pomplun)
•2:00 pm — The Soul and the Whole of Being
(with William Desmond, *Jennifer Newsome Martin, and Cyril O’Regan)
•4:00 pm — Conclusions and Discussion of Closing Thoughts and Comments
(with *Brad S. Gregory and David Bentley Hart)

*Asterisks denote Session Chairs.


Halik Colloquium

On Monday, November 16 and Tuesday, November 17, the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) invites you to take part in "Afternoon of Christianity: Church and Theology for a Post-Secular Age," a Templeton Colloquium led by Msgr. Dr. Tomáš Halík, 2014 Templeton Prize Laureate and Professor of Philosophy at Charles University in Prague. Tomáš Halík is in residence fall 2015 as a Templeton Fellow at the NDIAS.

There is no registration, and the colloquium is free and open to the public.

This colloquium brings together scholars from history, philosophy, political science, sociology, and theology to examine the crisis of modern Western Christianity and how its members can seek the path to a deeper, more credible and mature form of church, theology and spirituality.

The sessions will take place in 104 McKenna Hall and will also be simulcast live on the NDIAS website. We also encourage you to review a pre-circulated paper written by Tomáš Halík.

This colloquium is sponsored by the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study, with generous funding from the John Templeton Foundation.

flash3D Flash/HTML5 Conference Schedule

pdficon_smallConference Schedule

pdficon_smallConference Poster
 

Monday, November 16
•9:00 am — Introduction: The Afternoon of Christianity
•10:45 am  — Secularization: Divorce Between Christianity and Religion? (Presenters: William Barbieri, William Cavanaugh, and Cyril O’Regan)
•2:30 pm — Return of Religion as Threat: Is the Contemporary Political Theology a Sufficient Answer to Religious Fundamentalism and  Extremism? (Presenters: Colby Dickinson, Anna Bonta MorelandDaniel Philpott, and Gerard Powers)

Tuesday, November 17
•8:30 am — Return of Religion as Opportunity: “Anatheism” and Post-Modern Philosophy and Theology (Presenters: David Bentley Hart, Jeffrey McDonough, and Anna Bonta Moreland)
•10:45 am — The Kenotic Church Open for Seekers: The Need for Change in Ecclesiology, Spirituality, and Pastoral Theology and Practice (Presenter: Philip J. Rossi, S.J.)
•2:30 pm — Conclusions and Closing Discussion


Invisible Aspects of Human Evolution (April 14, 2014)

“The Hunter Gatherer“ Copyright Todd Schorr

On Monday, April 14, the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) invites you to take part in "Invisible Aspects of Human Evolution," a Templeton Colloquium led by Jonathan Marks, Professor of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Jonathan Marks is in residence this year as a Templeton Fellow at the NDIAS.

There is no registration, and the colloquium is free and open to the public.

This colloquium brings together scholars from various fields and perspectives in anthropology to discuss the transformation of an anatomical human into a behavioral human, which seems to have taken place between about 100,000 and 50,000 years ago, a timespan notably impoverished of data, but whose eventual products would become art, kinship, morality, religion, and the myriad other features of what we call “humanity.”

The sessions will take place in 104 McKenna Hall and will also be simulcast live on the NDIAS website and blog dedicated to the Templeton Colloquia. For a complete schedule of events, visit our blog. If you wish to participate, we encourage you to review a pre-circulated paper on evolution written by Jonathan Marks.

This colloquium is sponsored by the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study, with generous funding from the John Templeton Foundation.

flash3D Flash/HTML5 Conference Schedule

pdficon_smallConference Schedule

pdficon_smallConference Poster

Monday, April 14
•9:00 am “The Origin of Language,”
•10:45 am “The Origin of Kinship,”
•2:00 pm “The Origin of Religion,”
•3:45 pm Question & Answer Session


Participation in God:
Reassessing an Ancient Philosophical Idea and its Contemporary Relevance (March 18-21, 2014)

Accession #: 1990.22 Artist: Anselm Kiefer Title: Emanation Date: 1984-1986 Medium: oil, acrylic, wallpaper paste, lead on canvas Dimension: 161-1/2 x 110-3/4 x 9-1/4″ Credit Lines: Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Gift of Judy and Kenneth Dayton, 1990

This colloquium, led by Douglas Hedley, brings together scholars from numerous disciplines, including the natural sciences, philosophy, theology, and literature, to examine the fundamental questions of participation in the Divine. Building on philosophical premises and drawing on a rich tradition of thought, including ancient and Thomist philosophy and the inheritance of participation following the scientific revolutions, this meeting of scholars will examine key ideas, conceptual definitions, the language of participation, and its logic.

There is no registration, and the colloquium is free and open to the public.

The sessions will take place in 104 McKenna Hall and will also be simulcast live on the NDIAS website and blog dedicated to the Templeton Colloquia. If you wish to participate, we encourage you to review a pre-circulated paper on participation written by Douglas Hedley.

This colloquium is sponsored by the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study, with generous funding from the John Templeton Foundation.

flash3D Flash/HTML5 Conference Schedule

pdficon_smallConference Schedule

Tuesday, March 18
“The Historical Background of Participation in the Divine,” with presenters Mark Noll and Brad Gregory (please note, this session has limited seating)

Wednesday, March 19
•8:30 am “Ancient Philosophical Understandings of Participation,” with presenters Stephen Clark and Gretchen Reydams-Schils
•10:20 am “Medieval Understandings of Participation,” with presenters Richard Cross and Stephen Gersh
•3:30 pm “Participation and Literature,” with presenters Christian Moevs and Vittorio Montemaggi
•7:00 pm “Participation and the Modern Scientific Worldview,” with presenters Ryan Mullins, Jacob Sherman, and Charles Taliaferro

Thursday, March 20
•8:30 am “Participation, the Image of God, and Evolutionary Theory,” with presenters Carl Gillett and Phillip Sloan
•10:20 am “Participation and its Contemporary Relevance: Metaphor or Metaphysics?,” with presenters Vittorio Hösle and Cyril O’Regan
•3:00 pm “Participation and the Natural Sciences,” with presenter Celia Deane-Drummond